LONDON (Reuters) – Britain’s listed companies should not publish preliminary financial statements for at least two weeks to better assess how the coronavirus epidemic is affecting their business, the Financial Conduct Authority said on Saturday.

“The FCA will be writing tonight to companies it is aware were intending to publish preliminary financial statements in the next few days to delay their planned publications,” the watchdog said in a statement.

“The FCA strongly requests all listed companies observe a moratorium on the publication of preliminary financial statements for at least two weeks.”

The government has told shops, restaurants and other public places to shut, and is advising people to avoid all non-essential travel.

Reporting by Huw Jones; Editing by Chris Reese

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