As the unprecedented impact of the coronavirus continues to unfold across the United States, it has been easy to forget that the 2020 election is just six months away.

Due to the Covid-19 pandemic, primary elections across the country have descended into disarray, with some states being asked either to put their health at risk or forfeit their democratic right to vote.

And as the public health crisis doesn’t show any signs of slowing down, with more than 1,200,000 confirmed cases of the disease across the US, many citizens have many question marks as to if and how the election will still be going ahead this year as planned.

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Joe Biden: 39 delegates

Bernie Sanders: 28 delegates

Joe Biden: 41 delegates

Bernie Sanders: 7 delegates

Michael Bloomberg: 1 delegate

Joe Biden: 17 delegates

Bernie Sanders: 9 delegates

Michael Bloomberg: 5 delegates

Bernie Sanders: 179 delegates

Joe Biden: 127 delegates

Michael Bloomberg: 15 delegates

Elizabeth Warren: 5 delegates

Bernie Sanders: 20 delegates

Joe Biden: 9 delegates

Michael Bloomberg: 9 delegates

Elizabeth Warren: 1 delegate

Joe Biden: 152 delegates

Bernie Sanders: 53 delegates

Joe Biden: 11 delegates

Bernie Sanders: 9 delegates

Joe Biden: 95 delegates

Bernie Sanders: 59 delegates

Pete Buttigieg: 14 delegates

Bernie Sanders: 12 delegates

Elizabeth Warren: 8 delegates

Joe Biden: 6 delegates

Amy Klobuchar: 1 delegates

Joe Biden: 11 delegates

Bernie Sanders: 9 delegates

Elizabeth Warren: 4 delegates

Joe Biden: 37 delegates

Bernie Sanders: 29 delegates

Elizabeth Warren: 25 delegates

Joe Biden: 72 delegates

Bernie Sanders: 52 delegates

Joe Biden: 38 delegates

Bernie Sanders: 27 delegates

Elizabeth Warren: 10 delegates

Joe Biden: 34 delegates

Bernie Sanders: 2 delegates

Joe Biden: 44 delegates

Bernie Sanders: 24 delegates

Bernie Sanders: 24 delegates

Joe Biden: 9 delegates

Bernie Sanders: 9 delegates

Pete Buttigieg: 9 delegates

Amy Klobuchar: 6 delegates

Joe Biden: 66 delegates

Bernie Sanders: 36 delegates

Elizabeth Warren: 2 delegates

Michael Bloomberg: 2 delegates

Bernie Sanders: 8 delegates

Joe Biden: 6 delegates

Joe Biden: 21 delegates

Bernie Sanders: 13 delegates

Michael Bloomberg: 2 delegates

Elizabeth Warren: 1 delegate

Joe Biden: 152 delegates

Bernie Sanders: 53 delegates

Joe Biden: 33 delegates

Bernie Sanders: 18 delegates

Michael Bloomberg: 10 delegates

Elizabeth Warren: 1 delegate

Joe Biden: 111 delegates

Bernie Sanders: 102 delegates

Michael Bloomberg: 10 delegates

Elizabeth Warren: 5 delegates

Bernie Sanders: 12 delegates

Joe Biden: 2 delegate

Michael Bloomberg: 2 delegates

Bernie Sanders: 11 delegates

Joe Biden: 5 delegates

Joe Biden: 66 delegates

Bernie Sanders: 31 delegates

Elizabeth Warren: 2 delegates

Joe Biden: 46 delegates

Bernie Sanders: 43 delegates

Joe Biden: 39 delegates

Bernie Sanders: 28 delegates

Joe Biden: 41 delegates

Bernie Sanders: 7 delegates

Michael Bloomberg: 1 delegate

Joe Biden: 17 delegates

Bernie Sanders: 9 delegates

Michael Bloomberg: 5 delegates

Bernie Sanders: 179 delegates

Joe Biden: 127 delegates

Michael Bloomberg: 15 delegates

Elizabeth Warren: 5 delegates

Bernie Sanders: 20 delegates

Joe Biden: 9 delegates

Michael Bloomberg: 9 delegates

Elizabeth Warren: 1 delegate

Joe Biden: 152 delegates

Bernie Sanders: 53 delegates

Joe Biden: 11 delegates

Bernie Sanders: 9 delegates

Joe Biden: 95 delegates

Bernie Sanders: 59 delegates

Pete Buttigieg: 14 delegates

Bernie Sanders: 12 delegates

Elizabeth Warren: 8 delegates

Joe Biden: 6 delegates

Amy Klobuchar: 1 delegates

Joe Biden: 11 delegates

Bernie Sanders: 9 delegates

Elizabeth Warren: 4 delegates

Joe Biden: 37 delegates

Bernie Sanders: 29 delegates

Elizabeth Warren: 25 delegates

Joe Biden: 72 delegates

Bernie Sanders: 52 delegates

Joe Biden: 38 delegates

Bernie Sanders: 27 delegates

Elizabeth Warren: 10 delegates

Joe Biden: 34 delegates

Bernie Sanders: 2 delegates

Joe Biden: 44 delegates

Bernie Sanders: 24 delegates

Bernie Sanders: 24 delegates

Joe Biden: 9 delegates

Bernie Sanders: 9 delegates

Pete Buttigieg: 9 delegates

Amy Klobuchar: 6 delegates

Joe Biden: 66 delegates

Bernie Sanders: 36 delegates

Elizabeth Warren: 2 delegates

Michael Bloomberg: 2 delegates

Bernie Sanders: 8 delegates

Joe Biden: 6 delegates

Joe Biden: 21 delegates

Bernie Sanders: 13 delegates

Michael Bloomberg: 2 delegates

Elizabeth Warren: 1 delegate

Joe Biden: 152 delegates

Bernie Sanders: 53 delegates

Joe Biden: 33 delegates

Bernie Sanders: 18 delegates

Michael Bloomberg: 10 delegates

Elizabeth Warren: 1 delegate

Joe Biden: 111 delegates

Bernie Sanders: 102 delegates

Michael Bloomberg: 10 delegates

Elizabeth Warren: 5 delegates

Bernie Sanders: 12 delegates

Joe Biden: 2 delegate

Michael Bloomberg: 2 delegates

Bernie Sanders: 11 delegates

Joe Biden: 5 delegates

Joe Biden: 66 delegates

Bernie Sanders: 31 delegates

Elizabeth Warren: 2 delegates

Joe Biden: 46 delegates

Bernie Sanders: 43 delegates

When is the election?

The 2020 United States elections will be held on the 3 November, 2020.

Voters are set to head to the polls on the day to select the next president, much of Congress and thousands of state-government candidates.

Who are the candidates? 

Voters will either decide to re-elect the current president Donald Trump and his vice-president Mike Pence or a new candidate.

With all other democratic candidates having dropped out of the primary race, Joe Biden has become the presumptive Democratic nominee. Therefore he is most likely to go against Donald Trump in the election this year. His running mate, and vice president if he is elected, has yet to be announced.

Could the election be delayed because of coronavirus? 

The November date for the election is set by federal law and Donald Trump does not have the power alone to delay as it is pre-determined by a law that stretches back to 1845.

By this law, the date is slated for the Tuesday after the first Monday of November every four years. To change the date, Congress would have to intervene.

Aside from this, in line with the constitution, Mr Trump’s term as president will run out irrespectively on 20 January, 2021, so it remains paramount that the 2020 candidate is elected.

Throughout the Democratic primaries, desire to delay or postpone primary elections have been huge points of contention between politicians in the states that have attempted to do so.

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While Democratic candidates have often sat in favour of postponing polling days until after stay-at-home orders, Republicans have usually pushed back against these attempts and in some cases have overruled decisions to ensure the elections go ahead.

Could the election go ahead by mail?

There has been much debate as to whether it will be possible for the election to go ahead solely by mail and absentee ballots.

At the beginning of April, Wisconsin court judges ruled that in-person voting would go ahead as planned, leading to a significant outcry from Democrats that voters were forced to decide between forgoing their chance to vote or risk being exposed to the novel coronavirus.

Late last month, Ohio ran the first major test of all mail ballot as a result of coronavirus in its Democratic primary. Around 1.5m votes were cast in the election by midday on Saturday, fewer than half of the total number cast in 2016’s primary.

The debate over absentee voting remains contentious and a countrywide compromise on the decision to go postal seems far from straightforward. Mr Trump and other Republicans have expressed fear that the use of all absentee ballots would lead to widespread voter fraud.

Democratic representatives have argued that forcing voters to choose between their democratic right and protecting their health by social distancing is an act of “voter suppression”.

Some states already cast their vote entirely by mail including Colorado, Hawaii, Oregon and Utah, however, their decisions to do so remain independent from the coronavirus outbreak.

However, 17 states require some kind of excuse for requesting an absentee ballot and would need to implement significant structural changes their rules to allow a mail-only election to go ahead.

What have politicians said? 

Mr Trump has publicly stood against the election going ahead by mail on a number of occasions.

“The things they had in there were crazy. They had things, levels of voting that if you’d ever agreed to it, you’d never have a Republican elected in this country again,” Mr Trump said in response to the $4bn Democrats had attempted to include in a coronavirus relief bill to safeguard November’s presidential election.

Mr Biden has urged that the government need to start considering how the election should go-ahead, but has also noted that a mail-only ballot would not be a “preferred route”.

“I think it’s time we start thinking about how we’re going to hold elections . . . Is it going to mostly be by mail, which is not the preferred route for everyone — how are we going to do that? How are we going to make it available to everybody?” the former vice-president told ABC News on Sunday.​

However, with the election date still a number of months away, and with the country facing one of the most turbulent political and economic periods for generations, it remains unclear exactly what could happen between now and the 2020 election.

“We’re in completely uncharted waters here and I don’t think anybody knows what’s going to happen,” Monika McDermott, a political science professor at Fordham University in New York, told The Guardian.

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